Pacific dogwood (cornus nuttallii)

The Pacific Dogwood (Cornus nuttallii, also known as the Western flowering dogwood), is a deciduous tree that finds itself at home at low, moist elevations. It can reach up to 20 meters (66 feet) in height, and has a black-brown, smooth bark. The bark had many applications for the indigenous people, including bows and arrows, a clothing dye, and a blood purifier.

The leaves of the Cornus nuttallii are oval shaped and oppositely arranged, with arcuate veins and different shades of green on both sides. They taper toward the base and are thick, with sometimes wavy margins, and can grow to 10 centimeters long. The flowers are white-green with purple tips about 5 mm across, surrounded by 4-6 white or pink pedals about 2-7 centimeters long. The stems of the dogwood tend to follow the leaf edge in an arcuate pattern.

 

 

  • Leaves oval, alternately arranged, with arcuate veins and different shades of green on both sides
  • Leaves taper toward the base and sometimes have wavy margins, can grow to 10 cm long
  • Flowers are white-green with purple tips, surrounded by 4-6 pedals colored white or pink, about 2-7 cm long
  • Stems tend to follow leaf edge in an arcuate pattern
  • Named after John Audubon
  • Collection prohibited in British Columbia

 

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